KY120 United – Zone 6 

Lexington Mayoral Questionnaire

District/Office:
Political party:
Nonpartisan

KY120 United – Zone 6 

Lexington Mayoral Questionnaire

KY120 United – Zone 6 

Lexington Mayoral Questionnaire

Question 1:

Do/did your children (if you have any) attend public schools? Why or why not?

Yes, my husband, Charlie, and I have two grown children who attended public schools in Lexington. We are strong believers in public education. I served as president of Glendover Elementary PTA Board, was a member of the Lexington Traditional Magnet School PTA Board, a member of Lafayette High School PTA Board & President & Treasurer of the Lafayette High School Band Association.

Question 2:

Do you support charter schools in Lexington, yes or no?

No.

Question 3:

Describe how you envision charter schools being implemented in Lexington, if at all.

While the Bevin administration and the General Assembly have approved establishment of charter schools, they have not been funded. It is my hope that they will not be funded or implemented here. I’m a member of the board of the University of Kentucky Martin School Board where we recently heard a presentation by Dr. Ron Zimmer, an authority on charter schools. The data he presented revealed that charter schools are failing to educate many children, especially minorities and low-income students. What charter schools do is drain tax money from the public school systems that desperately need it, while excluding some children from the education these schools offer.

If the school board does approve a charter school application, I want to work with them to put families first.

Question 4:

Given reports on how Charter Schools often fail when educating students with disabilities or of minority or low income backgrounds, how can charter schools ensure that all students are given access to quality education?

Let’s be clear that charter schools are ​exclusive ​and may be operated by companies having a profit motive. Their exclusivity means some students are left out, and we know which of our students come with increased cost: those with physical or learning disabilities, and those who need enhanced support, both educational and social. Perhaps a school could be established targeting this particular demographic. Even so, I oppose segregating one demographic of student from another, believing instead that schools, particularly high schools, should find ways to integrate students with all sorts of needs, preparing all of them for a real-world experience.

Question 5:

Has your political campaign taken contributions from charter school companies or investors?

No it has not and I would return any donations connected to charter schools or investors should it occur without my solicitation. I believe the donations a campaign receives are a strong reflection on the candidate and his or her principles.

Question 6:

What safeguards will you put in place to ensure that charter school companies who have donated to political campaigns are not eligible to be in Lexington?

The Mayor has the strongest voice in Lexington as its highest elected official to stand up for and speak for Lexingtonians and I will use it to shine light on bad actors and to raise awareness in order to safeguard the children of families of Lexington.
Since I am opposed to the whole idea of “privatizing” education, I hope to see no charter school companies here in Lexington. However, should the school board enter into such an agreement, I think it would be appropriate to review contributions to supporters of the contract and shine the light of transparency on them. I expect transparency throughout my administration and promote nothing less in others.

Question 7:

Would your administration override a school board decision denying a charter school’s application​?

I can’t see a scenario where I would override the school board. They are the experts and elected officials who make decisions about public education. I have full confidence in the school board and plan to work closely with education officials to do what I can as mayor to support public​ education. To me, that means taxpayer dollars that fund our schools must be used to support our public school teachers, staff and the tremendous needs of our classrooms – support that already has been, unfortunately, diminished by state lawmakers.

Question 8:

How will your administration work to support Fayette County Public Schools (FCPS) in general​?

As a member of the Urban County Council, I worked closely with the school system to establish a joint Council/School Board Committee which met regularly to address common issues. When I left Council service, no one continued the committee.​ ​I plan to have regular meetings with the superintendent and members of the school board, in addition to having dedicated personnel and lines of collaboration between members of my staff and the school board on issues that put families first.

Question 9:

How will your administration work with FCPS to support homeless students and families?

Transience is a huge barrier to success for students who are homeless. Under my administration, initiatives tackling family and youth homelessness will focus on keeping children and families in the same vicinity where the children are enrolled in school. That can help eliminate the constant shuffling between schools that some of our homeless students experience and create much needed stability that can increase student success.

Making sure our schools, shelters, and social service programs are synced to ensure no child falls through the cracks in receiving support will be a top priority.

Question 10:

How will your administration work with FCPS to support minority students and English Language Learners?

The Mayor’s International Affairs Commission and multicultural affairs initiatives have been a good start on working with the immigrant community. We are also seeing some initial success with the One Lexington program, which is currently focused on the Winburn area. The Mayor’s Office needs to expand its community relations efforts. That includes working with our District Council Members in areas with large minority or English Language Learner populations, and leveraging the efforts of programs we already have in place, like Partners for Youth and the summer youth employment program to make sure we advertise and provide access to those opportunities for our students.

I also want to audit programs the city has, even if it’s something as simple as our fire alarm installation program, to make sure minority and English Language Learner communities have not been left behind.

Question 11:

As Lexington is on the cusp of becoming a gigabit city, how will your administration work to make sure that the lower socioeconomic students have access to high-speed internet at home?

Students need to be digitally literate to succeed in today’s world. I will work with our current Internet providers to make sure our lower socioeconomic areas are not left behind as more homes in Lexington get access to gigabit Internet. This is really an issue of college and career preparedness and is one of the most important economic development issues we’ll need to address over the next five years.

Question 12:

Is there anything else you would like to add or share that hasn’t been asked?

I see your red and white signs all over Lexington, supporting our teachers and schools. I just would add: Bravo! You are taking your case to the citizens, educating them about your concerns and acting to empower all of us to become more aware and involved. Thank you.

Question 1:

Do/did your children (if you have any) attend public schools? Why or why not?

Yes, my husband, Charlie, and I have two grown children who attended public schools in Lexington. We are strong believers in public education. I served as president of Glendover Elementary PTA Board, was a member of the Lexington Traditional Magnet School PTA Board, a member of Lafayette High School PTA Board & President & Treasurer of the Lafayette High School Band Association.

Question 2:

Do you support charter schools in Lexington, yes or no?

No.

Question 3:

Describe how you envision charter schools being implemented in Lexington, if at all.

While the Bevin administration and the General Assembly have approved establishment of charter schools, they have not been funded. It is my hope that they will not be funded or implemented here. I’m a member of the board of the University of Kentucky Martin School Board where we recently heard a presentation by Dr. Ron Zimmer, an authority on charter schools. The data he presented revealed that charter schools are failing to educate many children, especially minorities and low-income students. What charter schools do is drain tax money from the public school systems that desperately need it, while excluding some children from the education these schools offer.

If the school board does approve a charter school application, I want to work with them to put families first.

Question 4:

Given reports on how Charter Schools often fail when educating students with disabilities or of minority or low income backgrounds, how can charter schools ensure that all students are given access to quality education?

Let’s be clear that charter schools are ​exclusive ​and may be operated by companies having a profit motive. Their exclusivity means some students are left out, and we know which of our students come with increased cost: those with physical or learning disabilities, and those who need enhanced support, both educational and social. Perhaps a school could be established targeting this particular demographic. Even so, I oppose segregating one demographic of student from another, believing instead that schools, particularly high schools, should find ways to integrate students with all sorts of needs, preparing all of them for a real-world experience.

Question 5:

Has your political campaign taken contributions from charter school companies or investors?

No it has not and I would return any donations connected to charter schools or investors should it occur without my solicitation. I believe the donations a campaign receives are a strong reflection on the candidate and his or her principles.

Question 6:

What safeguards will you put in place to ensure that charter school companies who have donated to political campaigns are not eligible to be in Lexington?

The Mayor has the strongest voice in Lexington as its highest elected official to stand up for and speak for Lexingtonians and I will use it to shine light on bad actors and to raise awareness in order to safeguard the children of families of Lexington.
Since I am opposed to the whole idea of “privatizing” education, I hope to see no charter school companies here in Lexington. However, should the school board enter into such an agreement, I think it would be appropriate to review contributions to supporters of the contract and shine the light of transparency on them. I expect transparency throughout my administration and promote nothing less in others.

Question 7:

Would your administration override a school board decision denying a charter school’s application​?

I can’t see a scenario where I would override the school board. They are the experts and elected officials who make decisions about public education. I have full confidence in the school board and plan to work closely with education officials to do what I can as mayor to support public​ education. To me, that means taxpayer dollars that fund our schools must be used to support our public school teachers, staff and the tremendous needs of our classrooms – support that already has been, unfortunately, diminished by state lawmakers.

Question 8:

How will your administration work to support Fayette County Public Schools (FCPS) in general​?

As a member of the Urban County Council, I worked closely with the school system to establish a joint Council/School Board Committee which met regularly to address common issues. When I left Council service, no one continued the committee.​ ​I plan to have regular meetings with the superintendent and members of the school board, in addition to having dedicated personnel and lines of collaboration between members of my staff and the school board on issues that put families first.

Question 9:

How will your administration work with FCPS to support homeless students and families?

Transience is a huge barrier to success for students who are homeless. Under my administration, initiatives tackling family and youth homelessness will focus on keeping children and families in the same vicinity where the children are enrolled in school. That can help eliminate the constant shuffling between schools that some of our homeless students experience and create much needed stability that can increase student success.

Making sure our schools, shelters, and social service programs are synced to ensure no child falls through the cracks in receiving support will be a top priority.

Question 10:

How will your administration work with FCPS to support minority students and English Language Learners?

The Mayor’s International Affairs Commission and multicultural affairs initiatives have been a good start on working with the immigrant community. We are also seeing some initial success with the One Lexington program, which is currently focused on the Winburn area. The Mayor’s Office needs to expand its community relations efforts. That includes working with our District Council Members in areas with large minority or English Language Learner populations, and leveraging the efforts of programs we already have in place, like Partners for Youth and the summer youth employment program to make sure we advertise and provide access to those opportunities for our students.

I also want to audit programs the city has, even if it’s something as simple as our fire alarm installation program, to make sure minority and English Language Learner communities have not been left behind.

Question 11:

As Lexington is on the cusp of becoming a gigabit city, how will your administration work to make sure that the lower socioeconomic students have access to high-speed internet at home?

Students need to be digitally literate to succeed in today’s world. I will work with our current Internet providers to make sure our lower socioeconomic areas are not left behind as more homes in Lexington get access to gigabit Internet. This is really an issue of college and career preparedness and is one of the most important economic development issues we’ll need to address over the next five years.

Question 12:

Is there anything else you would like to add or share that hasn’t been asked?

I see your red and white signs all over Lexington, supporting our teachers and schools. I just would add: Bravo! You are taking your case to the citizens, educating them about your concerns and acting to empower all of us to become more aware and involved. Thank you.

Get Involved

Question 1:

Do/did your children (if you have any) attend public schools? Why or why not?

Yes, my husband, Charlie, and I have two grown children who attended public schools in Lexington. We are strong believers in public education. I served as president of Glendover Elementary PTA Board, was a member of the Lexington Traditional Magnet School PTA Board, a member of Lafayette High School PTA Board & President & Treasurer of the Lafayette High School Band Association.

Question 2:

Do you support charter schools in Lexington, yes or no?

No.

Question 3:

Describe how you envision charter schools being implemented in Lexington, if at all.

While the Bevin administration and the General Assembly have approved establishment of charter schools, they have not been funded. It is my hope that they will not be funded or implemented here. I’m a member of the board of the University of Kentucky Martin School Board where we recently heard a presentation by Dr. Ron Zimmer, an authority on charter schools. The data he presented revealed that charter schools are failing to educate many children, especially minorities and low-income students. What charter schools do is drain tax money from the public school systems that desperately need it, while excluding some children from the education these schools offer.

If the school board does approve a charter school application, I want to work with them to put families first.

Question 4:

Given reports on how Charter Schools often fail when educating students with disabilities or of minority or low income backgrounds, how can charter schools ensure that all students are given access to quality education?

Let’s be clear that charter schools are ​exclusive ​and may be operated by companies having a profit motive. Their exclusivity means some students are left out, and we know which of our students come with increased cost: those with physical or learning disabilities, and those who need enhanced support, both educational and social. Perhaps a school could be established targeting this particular demographic. Even so, I oppose segregating one demographic of student from another, believing instead that schools, particularly high schools, should find ways to integrate students with all sorts of needs, preparing all of them for a real-world experience.

Question 5:

Has your political campaign taken contributions from charter school companies or investors?

No it has not and I would return any donations connected to charter schools or investors should it occur without my solicitation. I believe the donations a campaign receives are a strong reflection on the candidate and his or her principles.

Question 6:

What safeguards will you put in place to ensure that charter school companies who have donated to political campaigns are not eligible to be in Lexington?

The Mayor has the strongest voice in Lexington as its highest elected official to stand up for and speak for Lexingtonians and I will use it to shine light on bad actors and to raise awareness in order to safeguard the children of families of Lexington.
Since I am opposed to the whole idea of “privatizing” education, I hope to see no charter school companies here in Lexington. However, should the school board enter into such an agreement, I think it would be appropriate to review contributions to supporters of the contract and shine the light of transparency on them. I expect transparency throughout my administration and promote nothing less in others.

Question 7:

Would your administration override a school board decision denying a charter school’s application​?

I can’t see a scenario where I would override the school board. They are the experts and elected officials who make decisions about public education. I have full confidence in the school board and plan to work closely with education officials to do what I can as mayor to support public​ education. To me, that means taxpayer dollars that fund our schools must be used to support our public school teachers, staff and the tremendous needs of our classrooms – support that already has been, unfortunately, diminished by state lawmakers.

Question 8:

How will your administration work to support Fayette County Public Schools (FCPS) in general​?

As a member of the Urban County Council, I worked closely with the school system to establish a joint Council/School Board Committee which met regularly to address common issues. When I left Council service, no one continued the committee.​ ​I plan to have regular meetings with the superintendent and members of the school board, in addition to having dedicated personnel and lines of collaboration between members of my staff and the school board on issues that put families first.

Question 9:

How will your administration work with FCPS to support homeless students and families?

Transience is a huge barrier to success for students who are homeless. Under my administration, initiatives tackling family and youth homelessness will focus on keeping children and families in the same vicinity where the children are enrolled in school. That can help eliminate the constant shuffling between schools that some of our homeless students experience and create much needed stability that can increase student success.

Making sure our schools, shelters, and social service programs are synced to ensure no child falls through the cracks in receiving support will be a top priority.

Question 10:

How will your administration work with FCPS to support minority students and English Language Learners?

The Mayor’s International Affairs Commission and multicultural affairs initiatives have been a good start on working with the immigrant community. We are also seeing some initial success with the One Lexington program, which is currently focused on the Winburn area. The Mayor’s Office needs to expand its community relations efforts. That includes working with our District Council Members in areas with large minority or English Language Learner populations, and leveraging the efforts of programs we already have in place, like Partners for Youth and the summer youth employment program to make sure we advertise and provide access to those opportunities for our students.

I also want to audit programs the city has, even if it’s something as simple as our fire alarm installation program, to make sure minority and English Language Learner communities have not been left behind.

Question 11:

As Lexington is on the cusp of becoming a gigabit city, how will your administration work to make sure that the lower socioeconomic students have access to high-speed internet at home?

Students need to be digitally literate to succeed in today’s world. I will work with our current Internet providers to make sure our lower socioeconomic areas are not left behind as more homes in Lexington get access to gigabit Internet. This is really an issue of college and career preparedness and is one of the most important economic development issues we’ll need to address over the next five years.

Question 12:

Is there anything else you would like to add or share that hasn’t been asked?

I see your red and white signs all over Lexington, supporting our teachers and schools. I just would add: Bravo! You are taking your case to the citizens, educating them about your concerns and acting to empower all of us to become more aware and involved. Thank you.

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